Home High Security and Challenge Locks (869) Review: Nokē Bluetooth Padlock

(869) Review: Nokē Bluetooth Padlock

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My vises are made by Panavise, a U.S. Company.  The one with the wide jaws is the model 350.  The smaller one is the model 301. Both have the 312 Base mount – www.panavise.com

 

Comment(39)

  1. The most obvious attack vector in my mind (that wasn’t tried) is analyzing the BT traffic between the lock and the device to look for flaws there. Now, based on all the other evidence, it’s likely that they encrypted the transmissions, but it would still be something to look at.

  2. Bill apparently there was no need to break the back of the lock using brute force. I bought a few of these and wondered myself how to change the battery and got this answer from Noke –

    “You can change the battery on the padlock by unlocking it first, then twisting the back off in a counter clockwise motion.

    I have found success by placing the back of the Noke in a palm of your hand and using the other hand to press against the front, twisting the back off”

  3. That’s is one tuff lock to crack, some one did their home work,
    Maybe they should buy out Master lock, we wish.

  4. Can you just open it at anytime with an extra battery? Or will that only work if the internal battery is dead? If not, then it seems the key is just pop the cover off and use a watch battery.

    1. Watching the video again it looks like Bill had to press unlock on the app to open it still. Is that correct?

      1. Yes. The battery is just an external energy source, it still needs the iPad to open.

  5. Ok, what about a hole saw right in the front cover and just remove the ball bearing or actuator. Not picking but might be faster

      1. “You can change the battery on the padlock by unlocking it first, then twisting the back off in a counter clockwise motion.

        I have found success by placing the back of the Noke in a palm of your hand and using the other hand to press against the front, twisting the back off”

  6. Tough lock. 2 questions: 1. What’s battery life (seems like a hassle if one needs to carry batteries along once the original dies); &2. Can it be hacked with computer? If battery life is long and it’s not easily hacked, that’s a pretty nice lock.

  7. Well, can you honestly say one fact, It is not made by Master Lock. That is for dam sure. Master Lock could never produce a lock of this quality, vvery well thought engineering threw out the lock and a bad ass lock to deal with. But is it hack-able via computer. Differently made buy a lock smith/clock maker by the looks of the guts.

  8. Try drill a hole above motor connection, and apply voltage to actuator engine. If the engine is dead, at least try drilling the lid. Looks like the weakest part.

      1. It uses Bluetooth 4.0 LE which is very secure with additional encryption on top of that. It can’t be hacked any easier than your online bank account can be hacked.

  9. Great video as always! The motor and actuator look similar to the MasterLock 1500edbx, although this looks much more rugged. Any chance we can get some high res photos of the PCB (particularly what microcontroller it appears to use)?

    1. It only opened the lock because his iPad was near the lock. The battery port is just a way to get power to the lock in case the battery dies, you still need the iPad signal to unlock it.

  10. Actually i don't think this is secure as you say. Pop the back (which is clearly meant to be serviceable) pop the screws, pop the front and you're in. You don't even need to do much more, just yank the motor wires and you're there, best part, if you get access to the motor wires, and you have another motor with you, you can fine turn the thing until you've reached the unlock position, by turning your motor in to a dynamo that feeds the other one.

    All of this assumed that the back is something you can rotate to unlock, which it seems you can by the way it's designed.

    I'm actually quite shocked that it has Philips screws and not security screws on it.

    1. In order to remove the back plate, the lock has to be in the unlocked position with the shackle raised. It can’t just be twisted off by anyone.

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